TimberView Family Dentistry Phone Number | Midwest City Family Dentist   TimberView Family Dentistry Facebook | Midwest City Family Dentist TimberView Family Dentistry Twitter | Midwest City Family Dentist TimberView Family Dentistry Google+ | Midwest City Family Dentist TimberView Family Dentistry Pinterest | Midwest City Family Dentist
TimberView Family Dentistry Healthy Smiles Header | Midwest City Family Dentist

illumisure in Midwest City, OK | TimberView Family Dentistry

TimberView Family Dentistry Blog | Midwest City, OK Family Dentist
Goolge Reviews for TimberView Family Dentistry | Dentist in Midwest City, OK
TimberView Family Dentistry New Patient Info | Family Dentist in Midwest City, OK
TimberView Family Dentistry Location Julie Storm, DMD. 1342 S. Douglas Blvd. Suite B Midwest City, OK 73130 Office (405) 737-0404 | Dentist in Midwest City, OK
Spear Education Seal for Julie Storm at TimberView Family Dentistry | Dentist in Midwest City, OK
Invisalign TimberView Family Dentistry | Dentist in Midwest City, OKAACD Member Seal for TimberView Family Dentistry | Dentist in Midwest City, OKKor Teeth Whitening Seal for TimberView Family Dentistry | Dentist in Midwest City, OK

Healthier Teeth Thousands of Years Ago

As shocking as it may sound, people who lived in the Stone Age had healthier teeth then those who live in the 21st century. Think about if you can’t remember the last time you scheduled an appointment with your dentist.

For the past 7,500 years or so oral health has declined rapidly thanks to industrialization and human evolution. These changes have led to a decline in overall health including oral health.

Oral bacteria changes began when farming was introduced roughly 150 years ago. That coupled with the introduction of processed sugar during the Industrial Revolution caused a dramatic decrease in healthy oral bacteria. This allowed cavity-causing bacteria to dominate leading to dental caries. This literally means that your mouth is constantly in a diseased state.

Researchers examined the DNA of tartar that was found in human skeletons in order to analyze oral bacteria changes from the Stone Age, the hunter-gatherers, those from medieval times, and those who lived after food manufacturing was introduced. What they found was that the evolution of diet and human behavior has had a negative impact on overall oral health.

This is one of the first studies that has ever been conducted and is a sound record of how evolution has affected oral bacteria and the consequences that bad bacteria carry. One of the most significant conclusions as a result of the study is that modern mans bacteria is much less diverse than those who lived thousands, even hundreds, of years ago and could contribute to oral health problems such as periodontal disease.

Archeologists have also discovered very little, if any tooth loss and no cavities, which is quite understandable considering the fact that processed sugar didn’t exist. The only sweet food available to ancient humans was honey. Other advantages included root vegetables and other coarse foods that helped clean the teeth naturally.

The skulls that were examined also had a strong system used for chewing, and although the teeth were worn, they were healthy. According to research, this means that very little, if any food was prepared.

Because the wild boar and other animals were leaner than what is consumed today, which according to the ADA should be a well-balanced diet, the fat that was eaten usually came from nuts, fatty fish and marine mammals.

Although much has changed when it comes to oral bacteria, you can still keep your mouth healthy as long as you practice good oral hygiene, which includes brushing twice, flossing once each day, and scheduling regular appointments with your dentist.

TimberView Family Dentistry Bottom Green Border

American Association of Women Dentists | TimberView Family DentistryAcademy of General Dentistry | TimberView Family DentistryOklahoma Dental Association | TimberView Family DentistryAmerican Dental Association | TimberView Family Dentistry





Main Menu
Menu