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Anxiety Disorders and Your Teeth and Gums

Although anxiety disorders aren’t an issue for everyone, most people suffer from some sort of anxiety from time to time; it’s just a part of life. However, if you find yourself persistently anxious having overwhelming and uncontrollable feelings, it can be extremely frustrating. Worse yet, anxiety disorders can cause problems for your teeth and gums.

Anxiety Disorders Can Take Over Your Life

If your anxiety has started to take over your daily tasks, you could be suffering from a social anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, a panic disorder, or a generalized anxiety disorder.

According to Dr. Julie Storm from Timberview Family Dentistry, anxiety can also have an impact on your teeth and gums.

Below are some problems that can occur if you are overly anxious:

People with anxiety disorders may avoid seeing the dentist. This increases the risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

If you are taking an anxiety medication, it can also cause complications for your oral health. Some medications may decrease saliva production, which also adds to the risk. Medication side effects also include erosion caused by vomiting. Anemia and bleeding can also be an issue if you suffer from anxiety.

Things You Should Know About Anxiety Disorders

  1. The most common mental problem, anxiety affects both adults and children
  2. Over 40 million adults in the United States have some sort of anxiety disorder
  3. Only a third of people who have anxiety receive treatment, even though anxiety disorders are highly treatable.

Keep Your Teeth and Gums Healthy

If anxiety is an issue, maintain good oral hygiene habits. Brush twice and floss once a day. Schedule regular checkups with your dentist in Chicago and make sure to eat a healthy diet. Be sure to let the team from Timberview Family Dentistry be aware of your anxiety disorder.

If a fear of the dentist is an issue, schedule a time when you will not feel rushed. Bring some soothing music and talk to Dr. Storm about any concerns that you may have.

For more information regarding anxiety disorders and teeth and gums, or if you would like to schedule an appointment, call or click and make it today.

Eating Disorders Cause Damage to your Teeth and Gums

Eating disorders affect billions of people all over the globe.

According to Dr. Julie Storm from Timberview Family Dentistry, eating disorders such as Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Binging and Purging cause serious problems for your overall health, and your teeth and gums.

What are Eating Disorders?

People with anorexia or bulimia, or people who binge and purge, have a distorted body image and are never happy with the way they look and will punish themselves by limiting their food intake and by over exercising. People with eating disorders are preoccupied with body weight and food.

Eating Disorders Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexics see themselves as fat relative to body type and height. This life threatening illness can last for decades or a lifetime. People with anorexia starve themselves in an attempt to be, “Perfect,” which will never happen in their eyes. Food restriction causes malnutrition, which not only affects the body, but the teeth and gums as well. Dr. Storm explains that without proper food intake, the enamel and gum tissue will weaken leading to tooth decay and gum disease.

Eating Disorders Bulimia

Unlike anorexics, bulimics eat before purging. Although most people believe that bulimics gorge themselves that is often not the case. Some bulimics throw up everything they eat, while other bulimics will hit the drive-through five times before heading to the restroom to bring everything back up. When bulimics throw up, the stomach acid erodes the teeth. Acid erosion causes both dental caries and gingivitis, or the more serious periodontal disease.

Eating Disorders Binging and Purging

People who binge and purge often go through periods where they do nothing but eat. Junk food consisting of sugary sweets, starchy and fried foods will be consumed in mass quantities only to be purged after the episode. Just like bulimics, people who binge and purge bring up stomach acid that damages teeth and gums.

If you or someone you know is suffering from an eating disorder, seek medical attention. It’s also a good idea to schedule a dental appointment to make sure that your teeth and gums have not been damaged by eating disorders.

Call for a dental appointment today.

Are Your Old Dental Restorations Hiding Something?

You may think that your old dental restorations are doing just fine. However, your old  restorations could be hiding something.

According to Dr. Julie Storm from Timberview Family Dentistry, x-rays will not see decay under silver amalgam fillings, dental crowns, or root canals.

Locating Decay under Old Dental Restorations

One of the toughest parts of dentistry is to locate decay in, around, and under old dental restorations. Cracks, chips and breaks can occur in and around the filling or dental crown. It is also common to find decay under root canals. Dr. Storm recommends removal and replacement as it is the only way to get rid of decay.

Do All Old Dental Restorations Go Bad?

Unlike dental implants, which can last for the rest of your life, old dental restorations will need to be replaced. Eventually, your fillings, crowns, and even root canals will begin to show wear and tear. Just like the tires on your car, old dental restorations will need to be replaced if you have put too much mileage on them.

Signs that Your Old Dental Restorations are Failing

Look for Decay

Check out your old dental restorations. Look for black spots and lines around the seal of the restoration. Because those black spots are tooth decay it’s important to see your dentist right away. Schedule an appointment with your dentist in Midwest City if you notice any darkening around your restorations, including root canals.

Cracked and Chipped Dental Restorations

Chipped and cracked dental restorations hide food and bacteria. Furthermore, if you have a broken restoration, the rest of the filling or crown will soon follow. A chipped or cracked old dental restoration can cause serious health issues. You could even choke on an old filling.

Old Dental Restoration Leakage

Years of use could cause spaces to form between your tooth and the restoration. As a result, hat space allows saliva mixed with bacteria to cause further damage. If you notice gaps or spaces around your fillings call and schedule an appointment with your Midwest City dentist.

Timberview Family Dentistry will thoroughly examine your teeth to determine the state of your old dental restorations. Call for an appointment today.


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